Monthly Archives: August 2019

Migration report: D27 phones home!

D27 fall 2019 migration map

D27 sent another postcard – from Decorah! Our little eaglet began her fall 2019 migration on August 11. She arrived on her winter territory on August 25, 14 days and about 690 miles later. Between the 11th and the 13th, D27 flew an incredible 336 miles in 39 hours, averaging a speed of almost nine miles per hour. Her stats look like this: She flew her biggest day on August 12, traveling roughly 138 miles, or almost 20% of her

8-22-19 ~ Day Trip to Decorah

August 22, 2019: Sub-adult eagle in Decorah

Story and photos by Robin Brumm Thursday was supposed to be mostly sunny and high temps in the mid 70’s … What to do, what to do? Go to Decorah of course! So I got up at dark o’clock and off I went. When I got to Decorah I didn’t see anybirdie in the usual perch places. I parked the car and looked up at maple, and there was the sub-adult (SA)! How do they do that … Just appear

Videos from GSB and the Flyway!

August 21, 2019: Falcon Mackey at Great Spirit Bluff

We have videos from GSB and the Flyway! At Great Spirit Bluff, male peregrine Mackey drops by to check the rock ledge diner out, although he doesn’t stay very long. On the Flyway, ducks preen (don’t miss the lovely juvenile male wood duck), Sandhill cranes forage, eagles splish-splash, and birds take flight at dusk! We apologize for our sporadic posting – cam season is upon us and we’re out in Colorado working on the Fort St. Vrain eagle cam right

What bird is this?

August 17, 2019: American Avocet

What bird is this? https://youtu.be/VtOI3-WkTQQ. It’s an American Avocet! This surprise visitor showed up on the Flyway Cam this morning and back in July. When we first started looking into it, I thought it was an eastern bird moving west. But I was wrong! According to Birds of North America: “American Avocets specialize in using ephemeral wetlands of the arid western United States, and are iconic symbols and effective indicators of environmental stressors within western wetlands. Wide-ranging among seasons, Avocet

What’s In A Name? Eagles and Falcons

From John Howe: “You have asked us how we identify names for the raptors we follow. I can assure you that the eagles and falcons don’t care if they are called by a name or not. That is a human thing. However, we need to have a way to identify birds as we collect and share data. In the case of peregrine falcons, landowners and cooperative partners assign names as they please. In the case of eagles, we assign an

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