Tag Archives: Flashback

What is a Brood Patch?

March 30, 2018: Mrs. North's brood patch

This flashback blog was originally published on February 16 of 2017. Since we’re looking forward to eggs at all of our nests, it seems like a good time to discuss the brood patch – a result of the many hormonal changes that our eagles are experiencing as they come closer to laying eggs.  Press the arrows to view both of the eagles. Robin Brumm and Debbie Fulton got great captures of brood patches from the North Nest (Mrs. North, 2018)

Flashback Blog: Why did Mom and Dad lay eggs later this year?

Second egg for the Decorah Eagles!

This  blog was originally published on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, to answer questions about egg-timing. It discusses the correlation between new mates, temperature, humidity, and egg-timing.  We’ve been getting questions about egg timing. Why did Mom and Dad lay eggs later this year? Overall, avian egg-timing in the temperate zone is heavily regulated by the light cycle. As the days begin to lengthen, birds’ gonads swell and produce sex hormones. Around the end of January, our bald eagle pairs switch from

Flashback Blog: When will our eagles lay eggs? Bald eagle breeding in Iowa and Florida

Daylight Length Graph from Fort Meyers Florida

We’ve decided to migrate our old blogs here and wanted to share them in the process. Since eagles in Florida and the southern United States are laying eggs, we thought it would be a good idea to talk about daylight length, light intensity, and egg laying! TLDR: We’ll most likely see eggs in Decorah in mid to late February. We’re getting some questions about why the Decorah Eagles aren’t laying eggs yet. Are they going to lay eggs? Will the

Flashback blog: How do eagles stay warm in cold weather?

04/18/18: Mrs. North incubates through the snowstorm

This will be the first of many flashback blogs! We’ve decided to migrate our old blogs here and wanted to share them in the process. Since a polar vortex may be headed our way next week, we thought it was a good time to talk about eagles and cold weather! We get a lot of questions about bald eagles and cold weather. I’ve written a few posts on the subject, but thought I’d combine them here. Unique body features and

Eagles and Cold Weather

Mom and Dad in an April snowstorm, 2011

We get a lot of questions about bald eagles and cold weather. I’ve written a few posts on the subject and wanted to combine them ,Unique body features and changes in physiology and behavior help bald eagles maximize energy gain, minimize energy loss, and incubate eggs in cold temperatures. To maximize gain, eagles forage in groups, gorge food, and increase the assimilation of ingested food energy. To minimize loss, they become sedentary, seek protective microclimates, and reduce night-time body temperature.