Missouri Turkey Vultures

Pop Video | Who’s watching? | Donate | Cart Icon Shop
Welcome to the Missouri Turkey Vultures! This nest is located in the top of a barn in Marshall, Missouri. Turkey vultures have only recently begun nesting again after an absence of several years. In 2021, they laid their first egg on April 18. Turkey Vulture channel on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCf0ODR6Laiid_g2IV0D9hog.

MAKE A DONATION


About the Marshall Turkey Vultures

About the Turkey Vultures

The Marshall Turkey Vultures are nesting in an empty hay loft in a barn on private property near Marshall, MO. In general, vultures arrive in late March or early April and lay eggs in early May. Hatch begins about 28 days after the second egg is laid. Both parents incubate eggs and brood young.

Vultures eat primarily carrion. Although they prefer relatively fresh carrion, they are unable to tear carcasses open, which means they must wait until a carcass putrefies or is opened by mammals or larger vultures. This may be why they have been documented following bald eagles and black vultures.

Adult Turkey Vultures regurgitate food for their young, who fledge roughly sixty days after hatching. To learn more about turkey vultures in general, please follow this link to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website.

Adults

We will have more information after the adults return. Although vultures are classified as a member of the order  Accipitriformes, and so related to hawks, eagles, and falcons, males and female birds are similar in size and lack the strong feet and talons of most Accipitriforme birds.

Nests

Turkey vultures lay eggs in dark, quiet recesses, including rock outcrops, mammal burrows, hollow logs, thickets, hollow trees, abandoned stick nests, and abandoned buildings. Nest sites must be dark and isolated from human disturbance.

Quick facts
Common name: Turkey vulture
Scientific name: Cathartes aura
Both Sexes
Length: 25.2-31.9 in (64-81 cm) | Weight: 70.5 oz (2000 g)
Wingspan: 66.9-70.1 in (170-178 cm)
Lifespan: 20+ years in the wild. The oldest known turkey vulture, Tolouse, is 38 years old, and lives at the San Francisco Zoo.

Turkey Vulture Vocalization
This vocalization was taken from our cam in 2013. It includes two young vultures food begging and chasing a parent.

Learn More About Bald Eagles
April 19, 2022: DN15 and DN16

Eaglet Growth and Development: Week Four

We’re writing a series of blogs about the first few weeks of an eaglet’s life. An eaglet spends roughly 75 to 80 days in the nest. For about the first half, it grows and gains weight. For about the second half, it grows flight feathers and starts developing the skills it will need post-fledge. We will focus on week four in this blog. DN15 and DN16 turn 25 and 24 days old today. During week three (fourteen to twenty-one days),

April 5, 2021: DN13, left and DN14, right

Eaglet Growth and Development, Week Two

We’re writing a series of blogs about the first few weeks of an eaglet’s life. An eaglet spends roughly 75 to 80 days in the nest. For about the first half, it grows and gains weight. For about the second half, it grows flight feathers and starts developing the skills it will need post-fledge. We will focus on week two in this blog. In their second week of development, the eaglets will gain roughly two pounds, experience rapid growth in

March 26, 2021: DN13 eats breakfast!

Eaglet Growth and Development: Week One

We’re writing a series of blogs about the first few weeks of an eaglet’s life. An eaglet spends roughly 75 to 80 days in the nest. For about the first half, it grows and gains weight. For about the second half, it grows flight feathers and starts developing the skills it will need post-fledge. We will focus on week one in this blog. What can we expect in the first week following hatching? Like humans, growing eaglets have developmental milestones.

Canada Geese at 24 hours old, Charlo Osprey Nest, explore.org, just prior to the Big Leap

Canada Geese: Precocial versus Altricial

Altricial eaglets rely on parental care until they fledge. But goslings are precocial: capable of moving around, self-feeding, and leaving the nest shortly after hatch. What does that mean? Read on to learn more! Canada Geese and Bald Eagles: Precocial versus Altricial From Stanford University: A precocial bird is “capable of moving around on its own soon after hatching.” The word comes from the same Latin root as “precocious.” Altricial means “incapable of moving around on its own soon after

Egg Colors and Shapes

The Chicago Peregrine Program inspired me to write a quick blog on the colors and shapes of eggs. Bald eagles have white eggs, peregrine falcons have eggs that range from light cream through brick red, and red-tailed hawks have pale eggs that are lightly splotched with brown. How and why do the birds we watch lay differently-colored and shaped eggs? In general, female birds inherit egg colors and patterns from their female parents. Egg-shell is made primarily of calcium carbonate,

Click for More About Bald Eagles
News

We not have any Turkey Vulture news. Keep checking back!

2022 Cam Shutdown Announcement

2022 Stream Shutdown Announcement

We’re so glad we got to spend time with all of you this year – a wonderful year at the North nest and a hilarious, sometimes difficult, but ultimately hopeful year in Decorah! We’ll be shutting down our Decorah and Decorah North streams for maintenance on Saturday, August 20, at 5:00 PM CDT. Please join us for special celebratory chats and an end of the season fundraiser on our website from 3pm to 5pm on shutdown day. We’ll be reminiscing

July 29, 2022: HD and HM on the Y-Branch.

NestFlix and news from the North Nest, the Decorah Trout Hatchery, and Great Spirit Bluff!

Today DN15 and DN16 turn 129 and 128 days old. Last year, none of our camera operators reported seeing DN13 or DN14 at the North nest last year after August 14th. That got me curious, since we know the eaglets are beginning to wander prior to dispersal. I took a look at each year’s August map in two sections: one from August 1 through August 15, and one from August 16 through August 31. While most of our eaglets didn’t

July 25, 2022: DN15 on the babysitting branch at the North Nest

NestFlix and News From Decorah North, Decorah, and the Flyway!

Today DN15 turns 123 days old and DN16 turns 122 days old. How much longer will it be before they disperse? To date, we’ve tracked eight Decorah eagles with satellite transmitters: D1 beginning in 2011, D14 beginning in 2012, Four beginning in 2014, siblings D24 and D25 beginning in 2016, D27 beginning in 2017, and siblings D35 and D36 beginning in 2020. While a few of them did things their own way, most of them stayed within a mile of

July 4, 2022: A Red-Winged Blackbird dives and sits on DN16

News and NestFlix from Decorah and Decorah North

What’s going on at DNN and Decorah? At Decorah North, DN15 turns 101 days old and DN16 turns 100 days old. As hard as it is to believe, DN15 has been on the wing for 24 days – almost a month! – and DN16 has been on the wing for 16 days. Both of them are becoming strong, proficient flyers, although the place, be it log, nest, or branch, still looks like a wrestling ring every time DNF or Mr.

DN15 and DN16, Decorah North nest, 2022

North Nest Farewell Chat

Join us here to share your favorite North nest memories and say goodbye – for now! – during our final regularly scheduled Decorah North chat of the 2022 season. We’ll be starting at 6PM CT on Saturday, June 25, and ending at 7:30 PM, although we might stay open a little longer depending on how things go. If you’ve enjoyed watching this year – or any year! – please consider making a donation or becoming a monthly supporter. Your support

>> More News
Nest Records
Turkey Vulture 2022 Nest Records

Egg Laying
Egg #1: April 23, 2022 @ 4:45 AM
Egg #2: April 25, 2022 between 4:30 and 5:30 AM

Egg Hatching
Hatch #1: May 30, 2022 @ 12:45 AM
Hatch #2: May 31, 2022 @ 6:53 AM

Fledging
Still waiting!

Vultures and Outcomes >> Detailed Annual Information

Year Nest  Chicks Known Outcomes
2022 Marshall Turkey Vultures MOTV3, MOTV4 The vultures laid two eggs and produced two chicks.
2021 Marshall Turkey Vultures MOTV1, MOTV2 The vultures laid two eggs and produced two chicks.
Missouri Turkey Vulture Video Library

Missouri Turkey Vulture Video Library

Click the hamburger icon on the top right of the video below to watch this year’s videos, or view our full Missouri Turkey Vulture library on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/RaptorResourceProject.