Missouri Turkey Vultures

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Welcome to the Missouri Turkey Vultures! This nest is located in the top of a barn in Marshall, Missouri. Turkey vultures have only recently begun nesting again after an absence of several years. In 2021, they laid their first egg on April 18. Turkey Vulture channel on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCf0ODR6Laiid_g2IV0D9hog.

The Turkey Vulture cam has been shut down following fledge and dispersal. It will return next spring.

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About the Marshall Turkey Vultures

About the Turkey Vultures

The Marshall Turkey Vultures are nesting in an empty hay loft in a barn on private property near Marshall, MO. In general, vultures arrive in late March or early April and lay eggs in early May. Hatch begins about 28 days after the second egg is laid. Both parents incubate eggs and brood young.

Vultures eat primarily carrion. Although they prefer relatively fresh carrion, they are unable to tear carcasses open, which means they must wait until a carcass putrefies or is opened by mammals or larger vultures. This may be why they have been documented following bald eagles and black vultures.

Adult Turkey Vultures regurgitate food for their young, who fledge roughly sixty days after hatching. To learn more about turkey vultures in general, please follow this link to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website.

Adults

We will have more information after the adults return. Although vultures are classified as a member of the order  Accipitriformes, and so related to hawks, eagles, and falcons, males and female birds are similar in size and lack the strong feet and talons of most Accipitriforme birds.

Nests

Turkey vultures lay eggs in dark, quiet recesses, including rock outcrops, mammal burrows, hollow logs, thickets, hollow trees, abandoned stick nests, and abandoned buildings. Nest sites must be dark and isolated from human disturbance.

Quick facts
Common name: Turkey vulture
Scientific name: Cathartes aura
Both Sexes
Length: 25.2-31.9 in (64-81 cm) | Weight: 70.5 oz (2000 g)
Wingspan: 66.9-70.1 in (170-178 cm)
Lifespan: 20+ years in the wild. The oldest known turkey vulture, Tolouse, is 38 years old, and lives at the San Francisco Zoo.

Turkey Vulture Vocalization
This vocalization was taken from our cam in 2013. It includes two young vultures food begging and chasing a parent.

Learn More About Bald Eagles
Egg-laying Map

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Eaglet Growth and Development: Week Three

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April 5, 2021: DN13, left and DN14, right

Eaglet Growth and Development, Week Two

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March 26, 2021: DN13 eats breakfast!

Eaglet Growth and Development: Week One

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Click for More About Bald Eagles
News

We not have any Turkey Vulture news. Keep checking back!

February 16, 2021: DNF's first egg

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January 21,2022: Mr. North gleams in the bright winter sunlight

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Egg-laying Map

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>> More News
Nest Records
Turkey Vulture 2021 Nest Records

Egg-Laying
First egg: April 18 at about 10:56 PM
Second egg: Either late on April 20 or early on April 21

Hatching
MTV1 hatched on April 26 @ around 5:00 AM CDT
MTV2 hatched on April 27 @ around 1:00 PM CDT

Fledging

Vultures and Outcomes >> Detailed Annual Information

Year Nest  Chicks Known Outcomes
2021 Marshall Turkey Vultures MOTV1, MOTV2 The vultures laid two eggs and produced two chicks.
Videos

Missouri Turkey Vulture Video Playlist

Click the icon on the top left of the stream to view a full list of videos from our playlist, or visit our playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/c/RaptorResourceProject