Additional Falcon Cams

Red Wing Grain Peregrine Falcons

Red Wing
75°
clear sky
humidity: 78%
wind: 11mph SE
H 71 • L 70

The Red Wing peregrine falcons are nesting on the roof of the Red Wing Grain stackhouse in Red Wing, Minnesota. The site is located next to the Mississippi river and is rich in food resources. The peregrines may or may not be present year-round, but the camera is usually off in the winter. In general, the falcons begin courtship between early and Mid-March and lay eggs between late March and mid-April. Hatch should begin in early to mid-May, fledge generally occurs 38-40 days after that, and young disperse in late August or mid-September. If one or both of the adults migrate, they leave in the late fall. Adult falcon pairs are not believed to migrate together. Click here for [popup url=”https://www.raptorresource.org/calendar/history.php?PlaceID=RWG” height=”500″ width=”750″ scrollbars=”yes” alt=”popup”]Detailed Annual Information[/popup].

Peregrine falcons do not make stick nests. Instead, they make scrape nests on ledges and debris, and feed primarily on birds that they catch in the air. To learn more about peregrine falcons in general, please follow this link to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/id.


Bay State Milling Peregrine Falcons

Winona
65°
broken clouds
humidity: 72%
wind: 3mph S
H 62 • L 62

The Bay State Milling peregrine falcons are nesting on the roof of the Bay State Milling building in Winona, Minnesota. The site is located next to the Mississippi river and is rich in food resources. The peregrines may or may not be present year-round, but the camera is usually off in the winter. In general, the falcons begin courtship between early and Mid-March and lay eggs between late March and mid-April. Hatch should begin in early to mid-May, fledge generally occurs 38-40 days after that, and young disperse in late August or mid-September. If one or both of the adults migrate, they leave in the late fall. Adult falcon pairs are not believed to migrate together. Click here for [popup url=”https://www.raptorresource.org/calendar/history.php?PlaceID=BSM” height=”500″ width=”750″ scrollbars=”yes” alt=”popup”]Detailed Annual Information[/popup].

Peregrine falcons do not make stick nests. Instead, they make scrape nests on ledges and debris, and feed primarily on birds that they catch in the air. To learn more about peregrine falcons in general, please follow this link to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/id.