Decorah North Bald Eagles

  • 17.6
    °F
  • 0.0
    mph
  • Nesting Calendar

    February 2018
    Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
    January 29, 2018 January 30, 2018 January 31, 2018 February 1, 2018 February 2, 2018 February 3, 2018 February 4, 2018
    February 5, 2018 February 6, 2018 February 7, 2018 February 8, 2018 February 9, 2018 February 10, 2018 February 11, 2018
    February 12, 2018 February 13, 2018 February 14, 2018 February 15, 2018 February 16, 2018 February 17, 2018 February 18, 2018
    February 19, 2018 February 20, 2018 February 21, 2018 February 22, 2018 February 23, 2018 February 24, 2018 February 25, 2018
    February 26, 2018 February 27, 2018 February 28, 2018 March 1, 2018 March 2, 2018 March 3, 2018 March 4, 2018

    About the Eagles

    The Decorah North eagles are nesting on private property north of Decorah. Their very large nest is located in a white oak tree in a scrap of forest bordering a valley and an excellent stream is located just across a field where cattle are pastured. In general, they begin courtship in October, productive mating in late January or early February, and egg-laying in mid to late February. Hatching usually begins in late March to early April, and the eaglets fledge in mid-to-late June. While young usually disperse between August and October, the adults remain on territory year round.

    Spring Grove Logo

    Thanks to Spring Grove Communications for their help bringing the Decorah North Nest to the world!

    The eagles eat live and and dead fish, squirrels, other birds, rabbit, muskrat, deer, possum and anything else they can catch or find. To learn more about bald eagles in general, please follow this link to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website. Thanks to A2Z Security Cameras for their help and support with our new HD cameras!

    Mom and Dad
    We know very little about the adults here, although they are both sexually mature bald eagles that are older than five years of age (Click here for a guide to aging bald eagles based on plumage color and patterns). We think that Mr. North may have been a first-time father in 2016 based on their egg-laying chronology, but since neither of them are banded, we have no way to verify that. We have had the same female on site since we began watching them in 2016.

    The nest we are watching now is the third nest built on this territory since 2009. The first nest (DNN0) was built in a pine tree. The branches collapsed after the second nesting season and the eagles moved to a dead elm tree. They nested there for just one year before moving to their current location in late 2013. 2018 will mark their fifth season in this nest.

    • 2009: A pair of eagles establishes the Decorah North territory, building a nest in a white pine tree.
    • 2011: The branches holding the nest collapse. The eagles build a new nest in a dead elm tree.
    • 2013: The tree falls. The eagles begin a new nest in a white oak tree.
    • 2015: Cameras are added to the North nest in very early fall.

    The North nest is about 56 feet off the ground. It is nine feet long at its longest point, seven feet wide at its widest point, is about 5.5 feet high, and has a perimeter of roughly 25 feet.


    Common name: Bald Eagle
    Scientific name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus
    Length: 2.3–3.1 feet | 71–96 cm
    Wingspan: 5.9 – 7.5 feet | 1.7-2.2 meters
    Weight: 6.5 – 13.8 pounds | 3–6.3 kilograms
    Lifespan: Up to 40 years in the wild

    Bald Eagle Vocalization

    Links


    Decorah North Eagles 2018 Nesting Record

    Egg-Laying

    Hatching

    Fledging

    Eaglet Ages


    Eaglets and Outcomes    >>

    Year Nest  Eaglets Known Outcomes
    2017 DN3 3 – DN4, DN5, DN6 3 eggs hatched. DN6 died of hypothermia
    shortly after hatch. DN4 and DN5 survived
    to fledge.
    2016 DN3 3 – DN1, DN2, DN3 3 eggs hatched. DN3 died of cold and
    malnourishment on May 11. Sibling
    aggression was a significant factor. DN2
    was killed by contaminated prey on
    May 25th. DN1 survived to fledge.

    We often get questions about where the eaglets go after they disperse. We have never tracked eaglets from this nest, but we have tracked eaglets from the Decorah nest. For more information, visit our eagle maps.

    This is a field guide to birds we see and hear around N2B. Click a bird to learn more about it!

    American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)
    American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)

    American Robin (Turdus migratorius)
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius)

    Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)
    Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)

    Brown-Headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)
    Brown-Headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)

    Canada Goose (Branta Canadensis)
    Canada Goose (Branta Canadensis)

    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)

    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)
    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)

    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

    House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)
    House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)

    Killdeer (Charadrius vociferous)
    Killdeer (Charadrius vociferous)

    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)

    Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)
    Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)

    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)

    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)

    White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)
    White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)

    White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)
    White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)

    Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius)
    Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius)


    Decorah North Eagles Video Playlist

    Click the icon on the top left of the stream to view a full list of videos from our 2018 playlist, or visit our playlist here:

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