Tag Archives: FAQ

Peek inside a bald eagle egg: 17 days!

A chicken embryo roughly halfway to hatch

This blog was first published on March 23, 2017. We reposted it to give everyone a peek inside the eggs. As of this writing, there are two eagle eggs in Decorah. We’re not sure whether the oldest or second oldest egg cracked, but we do know that the youngest is about 17.5 days old. What do embyronic eagles look they look like as they develop and grow inside their eggs? Dr. Peter Sharpe from the Institute for Wildlife Studies developed a

Your questions, answered: Questions from Explore followers!

Since we weren’t able to get to everyone’s questions during our chat on Explore, we answered them here. Watch the full chat here! https://youtu.be/MCtdzn13aSI.  How do eagles feet not freeze? An eagle’s legs use counter-current heat exchange to control body temperature. Warm arterial blood flowing from an eagle’s core into its feet passes cool venous blood flowing the other way. Heat is exchanged, warming the blood flowing into its core and cooling the blood flowing into its feet. The cooler blood

Peek inside a bald eagle egg: 11 days!

Chicken embryos roughly 25% of the way to hatch

This blog was first published on March 23, 2017. We reposted it to give everyone a peek inside the eggs. As of this writing, the first Decorah egg is 11 days, 10 hours old, the second egg is seven days, 14 hours old, and the third egg is three days, 13 hours old. What do embyronic eagles look they look like as they develop and grow inside their eggs? Dr. Peter Sharpe from the Institute for Wildlife Studies developed a table

Peek inside a bald eagle egg: 4 days!

This blog was first published on March 23, 2017. We reposted it to give everyone a peek inside the eggs. As of this writing, the first Decorah egg is 3 days, 12 hours old, the first Decorah North egg is 4 days, 19 hours old, and the second Decorah North egg is 1 day, 22 hours old.  What do embyronic eagles look they look like as they develop and grow inside their eggs? Dr. Peter Sharpe from the Institute for Wildlife

Eggs and cold weather

04/18/18: Mrs. North incubates through the snowstorm

This blog was first published on Wednesday, February 26, 2014. It has been updated to reflect Mom’s new mate and includes some information about the Fort St. Vrain eagles as well. Everyone was worried about the eggs in Decorah back in 2014. Iowa was facing a polar vortex while Mom was laying and incubating eggs. While there have been other cold years, 2014 was one for the record books, with windchills of -50F when Mom laid egg #2. Given that 2019

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