Tag Archives: FAQ

Oh, poop shoot!

April 16, 2018: Poop Shoot!

Everyone poops, but birds do it a little differently than we do. Next time you are washing bird poop off your car, or laughing at eagle poop shoots, take time to consider an eagle’s whole pooping process! The basic chain of events goes something like this. An eagle catches a fish and eats it. The bits of fish move from the eagle’s esophagus into an expandable storage pouch called the crop, which allows birds to gorge food much faster than

Peek inside a bald eagle egg: 11 days!

Chicken embryos roughly 25% of the way to hatch

This blog was first published on March 23, 2017. We reposted it to give everyone a peek inside the eggs! As of this writing, the first Decorah egg is 18 days old, the second egg is 15 days old, and the third egg is 11 days old. What do embyronic eagles look they look like as they develop and grow inside their eggs? Dr. Peter Sharpe from the Institute for Wildlife Studies developed a table of bald eagle embryonic development based

Your questions, answered! Does DM2 learn from Mom? Will just one copulation fertilize all of Mom’s eggs?

Group of people look through binoculars 175x175 - Your questions, answered! Does DM2 learn from Mom? Will just one copulation fertilize all of Mom's eggs?

As part of our first egg fundraiser on February 28, John took questions from watchers over at Explore.org. A follower asked whether DM2’s maturity was the result of learning from Mom or his instincts maturing as he matures. We often talk about learning and instinct, as opposed to learning versus instinct. While instinct appears to take a bigger role in eagle behavior, eagles also learn. John’s answer: Much of an eagle’s behavior is innate. Instinct guides a wide range of

Peek inside a bald eagle egg: 4 days!

An embryonic bird at 33 hours

As of this writing, the last Decorah egg is 22 hours old, the last Decorah North egg is 9 days, 23 hours old, and the last Fort St. Vrain egg is 12 days, 22 hours old. What do embyronic eagles look they look like as they develop and grow inside their eggs? Dr. Peter Sharpe from the Institute for Wildlife Studies developed a table of bald eagle embryonic development based on work done by Hamburger and Hamilton (1951). While not all

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